2 months ago for day 135, with 310 words.

The Window Metaphor: What aren’t we seeing when we look up? (4/n)

Looking from the outside

When we observe space from earth, we have to deal with serval issues in our atmosphere (troposphere) and the others we are looking through. Things like the thickness of the air and light pollution. So, what happens when we put a telescope outside of the earth's atmosphere to avoid these restrictions?

First, let’s take a moment to appreciate the fact that the Hubble Telescope (one of many floating in orbit) has an Instagram. Hard to think that there are any other Instagram content stacks up to images and videos of far off stars and galaxies- pictures of food stand no chance.

When we observe from the earth's surface, things like heat in the atmosphere causes a wobble in the image due to the changes the different temperatures in the atmospheres of the earth. Other contributing factors on why telescope images are better from space are the fact that there are lots of particles and dust molecules moving around in the different layers of earth's atmosphere.

This avoidance of these visual interferences is a huge advantage for researchers and scientist to observe other areas of space. Many famous discoveries have been made because of the Hubble telescope. For instance, the four dwarf moons that orbit Pluto were discovered by the Hubble telescope.

Who has the keys?

The Hubble telescope is a huge advancement in space observation, but who's to credit and who "owns it"?

Quick history lesson...

Back in 1923, Hermann Oberth (German scientist) thought it would be a cool idea to launch a telescope into orbit in order to avoid those observation distortions that the atmosphere causes. Back then though, rocket launches weren't yet a common thing. However, as time progressed and the rocket technology also advanced, the idea became more and more feasible.

To be continued...

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By Aaron

At one point I had a pet horse, dwarf rabbit, snake, Guinea pig, and an Iguana 🐇

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